Reflexology

Reflexology bears a resemblance to acupressure, except that it focuses almost entirely on the feet and hands as the recipients of the therapeutic action. A wide variety of techniques, in addition to pressure, are used to flush out toxins and rejuvenate the body; these include linear percussion machines, ice/heat, intra/ultra sound, noncoherent/coherent (Low Level Laser) light, magnetism, piezo/micro amp electricity, and vacuum cups/boots.

THEOREM:
That OSMOTIC PRESSURE and CONGESTION from the MIXTURE of CONGEALING BLOOD PROTEINS, EXCESSIVE WATER, METABOLIC BYPRODUCTS, DEAD CELLS, FOREIGN PROTEINS, and TOXIC CHEMICALS DEFILE the DRY STATE of the INTERSTITIUM
(SPACE BETWEEN the CELLS);
which defiling congestion
BLOCKS OXYGEN and NUTRIENT ACCESS
to said CELLS; the byproduct/result of which reveals the FUNDAMENTAL CAUSE of DISEASE and its REVERSAL the DESIRED CURE; and the means to PREVENTION of PAIN, DISEASE and premature DEATH.

    Moreso than most other "Eastern-style" healing techniques, reflexology has been exhaustively tested in studies of many various designs, and its practitioners have carried out considerable scientific investigation into its mechanism of action in terms understandable to (and acceptable by) modern Western scientists. The consensus is that reflexology's mechanism involves a photo-bioelectric effect, which has been extensively studied in other contexts and is well understood. As published by the Reflexology Association of America (quite awhile ago!), the dynamic photo-bioelectric effect of the "Reflexology Mechanism of Action" is best understood in light of the theorem reproduced in the box to the left. Although its claims as far as cause and effect might be open to argument, the underlying scientific postulates are sound and have been observed in a myriad number of examples in different contexts. The Modern Institute of Reflexology's site probably explains the therapy in its most scientific terms but which are understandable to any intelligent lay person.

    As mentioned in the context of acupressure, either the hand or foot can act as a microcosm of the body, with regard to the relative positions of the various organs and bodily systems. In fact, there is a very slick interactive map that can be appreciated by visiting this link. The major measurable effect of reflexological stimulation of a site is immediate vasodilation of the area, which is connected via neural pathways to the point on the foot or hand being stimulated.

    The results of the successful application of reflexology to current medical problems have been published in many peer-reviewed journals. A very conclusive report showed that reflexology enabled postoperative patients to use less than half of the analgesics required by the control group. A notable feature of this paper is that the background of reflexology is presented in a short summary, and its effect on pain perception is clearly explained in terms of the currently accepted mechanism of pain modulation, referring to reflexology's generation of slow-transmitting C-fibers, which then carry pain signals instead of the usual fast-transmitting A (δ) fibers. The C fibers also act by impeding the transmission along A fibers, in accordance with the gate theory of pain transduction. It all makes perfect scientific sense. In fact, the global ability of reflexology to warm certain predictable areas of the body, as quantified by infrared detection, was recently reported. In fact, a web site is devoted solely to disseminating the results of reflexology research.

    The Reflexology Association of America is the body that sets standards, educational requirements, and other milestones which qualify a practitioner to claim to be a practitioner (or a higher designation). There are also two organizations which test, accredit, and set standards for the practice: the American Commission for Accreditation of Reflexology Education and Training (ACARET) and the American Reflexology Certification Board.

American Reflexology Certification Board

International Council of Reflexologists - email